Azara Blog: 'Genetically Modified' Beet

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Date published: 2005/01/19

The BBC says:

Some genetically-modified crops can be managed in a way that is beneficial to wildlife, a UK research team believes.
Their work, published by the Royal Society, says there is "conclusive evidence" of benefits to wildlife from GM sugar beet crops.
They say their findings mean everyone involved in the debate about GM crops should rethink where they now stand.
But anti-GM campaigners say the work changes nothing, and are still opposed to any use of the crops in the UK.

Well anti-GM campaigners are anti-GM for theological reasons (they hate big corporations and they hate most technology that is less than 200 years old), so obviously they would never be convinced by any evidence about anything. Religous zealots rely on faith for their guidance.

It is bizarre in any case that whether a crop should be allowed to be grown is totally dependent on whether or not some arbitrary set of studies allegedly shows it is "good" or "not so good" as existing crops for wildlife. This is a cop out, set up as a criterion by the British ruling classes so they can forbid GM without having to come up with any real reason for doing so. With this crazy idea you might as well ban all crops which aren't "best in class" for this extremely narrow condition.

On BBC Radio 4 this morning one of the anti-GM campaigners suggested another reason GM crops shouldn't be grown is that "the people" don't want GM food. Well this is because the campaigners have run a successful scare campaign. It is amusing that on this one issue they are prepared to listen to "the people" but not on other issues such as car usage and low-density housing where "the people" should shut up and do as they are told.

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