Azara Blog: The British are allegedly no happier now than in 1973

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Date published: 2008/04/09

The BBC says:

After 30 years of unprecedented economic growth, the British are richer, healthier - but no happier than in 1973.

The latest Social Trends, the annual survey on the state of the nation from the Office for National Statistics, looks at how Britain has changed over the last few decades.

It shows that household income has gone up by 60%, and household wealth has more than doubled, in the past twenty years.

The main reason for the rise in wealth has been the increase in house prices.

But the growing wealth has not led to greater happiness.

In 1973, 86% of people said they were satisfied with their standard of living, while in 2006 85% were satisfied.

The figures follow trends from around the world that show that happiness and satisfaction do not correlate with average income once countries reach "middle-income" levels.

And one in six UK adults reported that they suffered from a variety of mental health problems in the latest survey, of which the largest category was "mild anxiety and depression."

Just ask the academic middle class people who write this kind of nonsense for the BBC if they would be happy to have a 40% pay cut and they would soon enough admit that indeed, this story is just nonsense. You are never going to get 100% of people to say that they are happy, and even if you did, does that mean that nobody wants to earn an extra penny? The real question is how many of these people would be happy to go back to the living standards of 1973 (or earlier)? Pretty much nobody (except for some of the usual suspects in the academic middle class who seem to want to go back to 1773, or before).

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