Azara Blog: Ofsted publishes another pointless report

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Date published: 2009/01/08

The BBC says:

Children in the north of England are more emotionally secure than elsewhere in the country, according to an Ofsted survey of pupil well-being.

The poll of 150,000 10 to 15-year-olds also shows teenagers in some of the most disadvantaged areas are less likely to take drugs and alcohol.

Pupils in inner London reported the lowest rates of substance misuse. Rates were higher in London's leafy suburbs.

Children in south west England were most likely to report being bullied.

Ofsted's Tell Us survey gives each local authority a score on five different measures: happiness, bullying, participation in activities - such as sports, substance misuse and satisfaction with parks and play areas.

Its overall findings were released in October but this is the first time details of the regional differences have been published.

Ofsted is a pointless organisation whose main aim in life seems to be to justify its own existence. This report is a classic example of money being wasted on bureaucrats rather than being spent on education. It is quite amazing that the BBC can run this story with a straight face. "Pupils in inner London reported the lowest rates of substance misuse. Rates were higher in London's leafy suburbs." Oh, we are supposed to believe what people say in a survey about substance misuse, are we. That would be novel. And, if by some fluke, substance misuse really is less in "disadvantaged" areas then is this because the students are more saintly or (more likely) that they don't have as much money to blow on the stuff? Does this report really mean anything or prove anything, especially with regard to education?

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