Azara Blog: Organic food allegedly has no health benefits

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Date published: 2009/07/29

The BBC says:

Organic food is no healthier than ordinary food, a large independent review has concluded.

There is little difference in nutritional value and no evidence of any extra health benefits from eating organic produce, UK researchers found.

The Food Standards Agency who commissioned the report said the findings would help people make an "informed choice".

But the Soil Association criticised the study and called for better research.
...
[Gill Fine, FSA director of consumer choice and dietary health, said] that the FSA was neither pro nor anti organic food and recognised there were many reasons why people choose to eat organic, including animal welfare or environmental concerns.

Of course the Soil Association is going to criticise the study. They are the major organisation demonising ordinary food and they are almost a de facto monopoly in deciding what is and is not deemed to be "organic", and so have a large commercial interest in perpetuating the idea that "organic" food of course must be better.

Gill Fine makes the important point that the "organic" lobby also claims other advantages, but the Soil Association constantly promotes the health angle as significant (and no doubt can find some study or other claiming this is true in some way).

And Fine didn't mention the psychological advantages from eating "organic" food, since the people who do so are largely middle class people who think better of themselves for eating "organic", and that in itself could be a health advantage (but probably the only one, if you believe this study). (Rich people love looking down on poor people, and the ability to buy "organic" food is just one example of that in the early 21st century.)

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